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July 1, 2016


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Blues legend Willie Dixon would have been 101.
Blondie singer Deborah Harry is 71.
Blues Brother Dan Aykroyd is 64.

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On this day in 1963, The Beatles recorded "She Loves You" and "I'll Get You" at Abbey Road Studios.

On this day in 1967, The Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" album hit #1 for the first of 15 weeks in the States.

On this day in 1969, The Doors released their "The Soft Parade" album, which featured the scandalous single "Touch Me."

On this day in 1970, Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Cosmo's Factory" album came out and soon became lodged at #1 for nine weeks.

On this day in 1972, Alice Cooper's signature song "School's Out" entered the charts on its way to three weeks at #2 as his million-selling album of the same name began its climb to #23.

On this day in 1978, Foreigner's "Hot Blooded" entered the singles charts on its way to #3.

On this day in 1978, The Cars' self-titled first album entered the charts on its way to #18 and six million sold — a solid debut indeed.

On this date in 1981, Steppenwolf bass player John Morey died in a car crash in Los Angeles at the age of 32. He is best known as the author of "Magic Carpet Ride."

On this day in 1987, The Grateful Dead released their most successful album, "In the Dark," featuring the song "Touch of Grey."

On this day in 1989, Stevie Ray Vaughan's final album, "In Step," began its climb to #33 while selling two million copies.

On this day in 1995, legendary D.J. Wolfman Jack suffered a heart attack and died in his home in Belvedere, North Carolina. He was only 57.

On this day in 2002, The Who performed at the Hollywood Bowl three days after the death of bassist John Entwistle. The surviving founding members of the Hall Of Fame band — frontman Roger Daltrey and guitarist Pete Townshend — decided they needed to play music to honor their old friend, and the following tour was one of their most intense ever.

On this day in 2007, Elton John, Rod Stewart, Bryan Ferry and Supertramp's Roger Hodgson were among the stars performing at London's Wembley Stadium for the Concert for Diana. Organized by Prince William and Prince Harry, the show was held on what would have been the 46th birthday of their late mother, Princess Diana.


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This Sunday night at 8pm on 100.3 The Sound of Los Angeles, OFF THE RECORD with Joe Benson will feature the music of — and conversation with — Eric Clapton. Check out this preview!

The Uncle Joe Show Menu

Friday 7/1/16


10 At 10: Red, White & Blue
Uncle Joe's Lunch Box (4-packs of Knott's Berry Farm tix!) @12:30pm
The Story - Eric Clapton @1:30pm
Laughter At 45 After - Kathleen Madigan

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It was Mark Twain who said: "I've lived through some terrible things in my life, some of which actually happened."

It was Sigmund Freud who said: "One is very crazy when in love."

It was Joseph Conrad who said: "Being a woman is a terribly difficult task since it consists principally in dealing with men."

It was John Watson (not Plato) who said: "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle."

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Factoids For The Fourth

The Declaration of Independence, unanimously declared by the 13 United States of America, was adopted by the Continental Congress in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. But the fact is that not one single signature was signed on that day. While most of the 56 names were in place by early August, one signer, Thomas McKean, did not actually sign the Declaration until 1781. Nevertheless, July 4th was the day singled out to mark the event of the United States establishing itself as a nation.

Of the signers, 24 were lawyers and jurists; 11 were merchants; 9 were farmers and large plantation owners; all were men of means and well educated. But they signed the Declaration of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured. Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War, with five captured by the British and tortured before they died. Most of the 56 lost family members, 12 had their homes ransacked and burned, and many died bankrupt. Such were the sacrifices of the American Revolution.

The first celebrations occurred shortly after the Declaration in various locales along the Eastern Seaboard. Much of the tradition inherent in the way we celebrate today was evident almost from the beginning. Sound, spectacle and sentiment played an important role in that tradition. One of the most elaborate celebrations in 1777 and the first organized celebration of its kind occurred in Philadelphia. This event had all of the elements of typical future celebrations — the discharge of cannon, firing one round for each state in the union; the ringing of bells; the use of music; the drinking of toasts (it would subsequently be traditional to have one toast for each state in the union); "loud huzzas;" a parade; fireworks; and the use of the nation's colors.

Whatever you do to celebrate, have fun, but please keep the fireworks away from the kids. And give pause to say a prayer for our troops still stationed so far away from home. God bless America!


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